Monday, April 17, 2006

Squeezing out the middle and lower class

From the Bergen Record:

The big squeeze

IT'S time New Jersey got serious about affordable housing. The state is one big boomtown for developers and owners of high-priced homes. Property values seem to rise every day. But residents on low or moderate incomes struggle to buy or even rent basic shelter.

Three decades after the state Supreme Court land use rulings were meant to deal with the problem, New Jersey has a persistent, structural shortfall of moderate-priced housing.

Under the so-called Mount Laurel rulings, communities could voluntarily agree to accept a "fair" number of affordable homes within their borders. The number is determined by the state Council on Affordable Housing. In return, participating local governments could stop a builder from using the courts to force an unwanted development on the community.

Yet many communities that opted to participate in the voluntary program have still to fulfill their Mount Laurel requirement; the state is well short of its goal of creating 118,000 units for people of moderate means.
...
Affordable housing has been built statewide at little or no detriment to communities, and it has helped make them more diverse. That's vital, considering that New Jersey is still one of the most segregated states in the nation.

Builders and communities need to get creative. They need to accept their responsibility to provide affordable housing, and work together – with affordable housing advocates - to ensure enough is built. They also need to ensure that the affordable units go to the needy, and not to those with political connections.

47 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

Why don't they stop the HELOC and 2nd home writeoffs. This for one would stop the subsidizing of speculators.
Demand tightened lending standards.
This would keep imbeciles out of the market and those most responsible for escalating prices.

Do not bid on a house at these prices. If so, bid alot less.
Do not look at houses.
Do no waste your time.
Do not write a letter to the seller staing why you want the house.
Buying a house is a business transaction...nothing else. Keep emotion out of the process.

4/17/2006 07:37:00 AM  
Blogger grim said...

I agree. The mortgage interest deduction on anything other than a primary residence should be eliminated.

Second, I feel that the home sales gain exclusion needs to be reigned in. Either drop the cap to $300-$400 thousand or increase the required residency timeframe (3-4 years in the past 5).

The way to make more affordable homes isn't to build them.

It's to eliminate the benfits that caused increased demand for 2nd homes. Eliminating those tax benfits will immediately reduce demand and keep prices in check.

As for requiring builders to build more affordable homes? It'll never work. It's almost impossible to keep those units from becoming 'market-rate'.

grim

4/17/2006 07:47:00 AM  
Blogger Shailesh Gala said...

Grim: I do agree that current Tax system favours buying 2nd home.

But at the same time, I do feel, building is also important aspect. There has to be some formula adopted which takes into account population growth and supply of homes. I am not talking about affordable homes offered lower than market rate. I am just talking about homes being available at Market rate. If some new stock is made available at all levels (not only McMansions), many people would upgrade, making their old homes available for starting families.

As far as the crowding argument, I feel some smart planning can reduce crowding. For e.g. Folks working near the workplace can reduce sprawl significantly.

I feel at present there is no state formula that takes into account population growth, and making sure there will be at least enough housing for that.

4/17/2006 08:18:00 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

is it the tax breaks or the easy credit backed by the derivitives market with what they claim is no risk and nobody is regulating this market.and also there is freddie and fannie. look how much these 2 have grown over the past 5 years.

4/17/2006 08:21:00 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

I agree with re-working tax credits and capital gains to some formula that really benefits middle income households, but doesn't create windfalls for speculators and investors.

Second, I think for the low end we have several wonderful groups that work well at providing affordable housing, Habitat for Humanity for example. Why not hand over land to them instead of developers? They don't have profit as their goal, just affordable housing.

JM

4/17/2006 09:08:00 AM  
Blogger lisoosh said...

The problem isn't just with taxes. The problem isn't just about purchasing a house.

Lack of affordable housing is at crisis levels in New Jersey. In the center of the state a 1 bedroom apartment averages rent of $1000 per month - $12,000 a year. Someone working full time in retail averages around $16,000 a year, making renting basic decent shelter unaffordable.

Before there are any NIMBY posts, just to make clear the income limits for purchasing affordable housing.
Varies by county but averages are as follows:
Low income - $40,000 year for a family of 4.
Moderate income - $70,000 year /4

Most people are worried about affordable housing in their districts because they think that they will be living next to/sharing schools with people on welfare, however the salary amounts are actually typical of young professionals and one income families with young kids.
No need to force developers to build them. Just require a minimum amount from each district and let them put them out to bid, someone will want the business.

4/17/2006 09:23:00 AM  
Anonymous UnRealtor said...

Not sure if Grim already posted this...


From Cherry Hill NJ's Courier Post:


SURVEY SAYS: Lenders predict real estate slide

Tuesday, April 11, 2006

Two-thirds of lenders nationwide believe a real estate bubble exists in the United States and half of them believe it has already begun to burst or will burst in the next six months, according to results of this quarter's Phoenix Management "Lending Climate in America" survey.

A significant 93 percent of lenders surveyed expect an anticipated housing correction to result in real estate prices declining 10 to 20 percent across the country.

Among the 92 lenders who participated in this quarter's survey, only 9 percent said they did not believe a housing bubble existed. When asked which area of the country was likely to be most affected by a housing correction, 30 percent of respondents named the Northeast, followed closely by 27 percent who predicted the West Coast. Fourteen percent named the Southeast.


http://www.courierpostonline.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060411/BUSINESS01/604110329/1003/BUSINESS

4/17/2006 10:56:00 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

"Two-thirds of lenders nationwide believe a real estate bubble exists.."

Troops in the field say bubble.

RUN FOR THE EXITS.

Low Balls Galore.

BOOOOYAAAAAAA!!!!!!

Bob

4/17/2006 11:03:00 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

“Rhonda is in a panic. The two-year introductory rate on her adjustable mortgage is about to expire and send her payments soaring. She thought she could refinance to a more-affordable loan, but the rates she’s being quoted are just as high.”

“‘So I then decided I would just sell the house and get out of it,’ Rhonda wrote. ‘WRONG! The houses in my area are selling for around $20,000 less than what I owe!’”

“Nearly one in 10 households with a mortgage had zero or negative equity in their homes as of September 2005. The study of 26 million homes in 36 states and the District of Columbia found that one in 20 home borrowers was upside-down by 10% or more. The situation is even grimmer for recent borrowers. Of those who bought or refinanced homes in 2005, 29% had zero or negative equity, and 15.2% were underwater by 10% or more.”

“Homeowners with no equity and adjustable-rate mortgages face additional risks from the loans themselves, since their payments could rise 50% or more in coming years as interest rates reset to higher levels.”

DO NOT BUY A HOUSE NOW ESPECIALLY IF YOU HAVE TO USE A RUISKY LOAN.

4/17/2006 11:11:00 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

“Real estate agents in the Panama City Beach area say some banks are putting fresh limits on pre-construction sales in hopes of avoiding investors’ becoming overextended. Projects have been halted. Motels or other businesses that were closed after they were sold to make way for development sit vacant.”

“Says Janet Roan, a local real estate agent, ‘Now is the time to buy. It’s a buyer’s market.’ But she offers a caveat. ‘If you are looking to buy something to flip it, don’t even try it right now.’”

“Zepponi advises condo owners to avoid putting their units on the market now if they can avoid it. ‘If people would stop this panic, things would turn around sooner,’ she says.”

HAHAHA A typical realtor response. The godsakes the downturn has JUST started!
DO NOT BUY A HOUSE AT THESE INFLATED PRICES.

4/17/2006 11:24:00 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

PATIENCE.

PRICES ARE TUMBLING AND IT WILL BE WONDERFUL TO DEAL WITH ACCOMODATING SELLERS KISSING OUR @$$e$.

4/17/2006 11:25:00 AM  
Anonymous UnRealtor said...

"If people would stop this panic, things would turn around sooner"


Priceless. If people would continue to pay 50% of their salary for a home, things would 'turn around' sooner, and they can then pay 60% of their salary.

4/17/2006 12:23:00 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

I have heard anecdotal reports that some NJ buyers who have made recent "trade-up" home purchases are starting to panic as they realize they are not going to get what they expected in selling their existing homes, and are seeking to find ways to void their pending purchase contracts prior to closing.

Anyone out there hear of any situations like this? What is the likelihood that such purchasers can successfully get out of having to follow through with closing their transcations?

4/17/2006 01:11:00 PM  
Blogger Richard said...

historically affordable housing has been equated to letting in the poor uneducated minorities(aka 'diversity'). today this isn't the case at all as college educated young folks can't even afford a starter house. the state is further segregating the population which will only hasten its demise. in 15-20 years i expect NJ to consist of the have's who are within a stone's throw of the city and everyone else, the barely squeaking by masses.

4/17/2006 01:27:00 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

The Panic begins.

See FSBO signs everywhere. NOT included in housing inventory.

Once the johnny come latelies start to get panicky watch out.

NO BID will be too low. Or the insulting lowball will be contemplated.

LOL!!

4/17/2006 01:39:00 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Also saw many houses on the market 120 days + pull realtor signs and go FSBO.

Good Luck suckas!

4/17/2006 02:02:00 PM  
Anonymous UnRealtor said...

This FSBO has been on the market for over 90 days:

http://www.forsalebyowner.com/show-listing.php?currentlySearching=1&iListingID=20586724

They started at "$975,000 Firm" and are now at "$919,500 Willing to negotiate."

They paid $585,000 in March 2003.

4/17/2006 02:06:00 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

'Willing to negotiate"?

HAHAHAHA!!!!!

Forget it suckas....

4/17/2006 02:50:00 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

$585k will be a loss in 2 years. If they have to sell it and are stubborn while riding it down.

$919K. Hope they get pricked for being so greedy.

Buyers are drying up and saying NO MAAS!

4/17/2006 02:54:00 PM  
Blogger skep-tic said...

Homes Too Rich for Firefighters Who Save Them
By JOSEPH BERGER
Published: April 9, 2006

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/04/09/nyregion/09volunteer.html?ex=1145419200&en=6c33ad1de6334aec&ei=5070

4/17/2006 07:56:00 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

I can never spend enough time blogging because I�m busy with my own real estate work, but I enjoyed your site. Too brief a visit, but thanks for the insight. Visit my site if you have a chance.

4/23/2006 11:39:00 PM  
Blogger Chris Moonbeams said...

Hi there, I was surfing the internet and I found your blog. I like the way how this all works. I'll come by again.

Many thanks,

las vegas condo

4/24/2006 08:27:00 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Blogged your blog and enjoyed the experience. Nice break from my own real estate work. Thanks. Visit my site if you have a chance.

4/25/2006 01:17:00 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Surf's up. Gotta get back to my own real estate sites. Thanks for letting me end the trip with a good read at your blog. Enjoyed it. Visit my site if you have a chance. you have a chance.

4/25/2006 03:05:00 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Blogged your blog and enjoyed the experience. Nice break from my own real estate work. Thanks. Visit my site if you have a chance.

4/25/2006 07:40:00 PM  
Blogger Paul Adams said...

Hey Blogger, you have a great blog here! I'm definitely going to bookmark you!
I have acredit center site. It pretty much covers credit center related subjects.
Come and check it out if you get time :-)
Best regards!

5/08/2006 12:12:00 AM  
Blogger Paul Adams said...

Hi Friend! You have a great blog over here!
Please accept my compliments and wishes for your happiness and success!
If you have a moment, please take a look at my site:
credit center
It covers credit center related subjects.
Have a great day!

5/08/2006 01:50:00 AM  
Blogger Paul Adams said...

Hi Fellow! I was just searching blogs,and I found your site! I like it!
If you have a moment, please visit my site:
credit center
It covers credit center related contents.
All the best!

5/08/2006 05:50:00 AM  
Blogger Joe Berenguer said...

Hi Friend! You have a great blog over here!
Please accept my compliments and wishes for your happiness and success!
If you have a moment, please take a look at my site:
credit center
It covers credit center related subjects.
Have a great day!

5/08/2006 03:07:00 PM  
Blogger Joe Berenguer said...

Hi, Fellow!I like your blog!
I just came across your blog and wanted to
drop you a note telling you how impressed I was with
the information you have posted here.
I have a loans center
site. It pretty much covers loans center related subjects.
Come and check it out if you get time :-)
Best regards!

5/08/2006 07:19:00 PM  
Blogger Paul Adams said...

Hi Friend! You have a great blog over here!
Please accept my compliments and wishes for your happiness and success!
If you have a moment, please take a look at my site:
credit center
It covers credit center related subjects.
Have a great day!

5/11/2006 11:55:00 PM  
Blogger James Baker said...

Hi Friend! You have a great blog over here!
Please accept my compliments and wishes for your happiness and success!
If you have a moment, please take a look at my site:
credit center
It covers credit center related subjects.
Have a great day!

5/12/2006 10:07:00 AM  
Anonymous Rick J said...

I have been following a site now for almost 2 years and I have found it to be both reliable and profitable. They post daily and their stock trades have been beating
the indexes easily.

Take a look at Wallstreetwinnersonline.com

RickJ

5/18/2006 05:09:00 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

In the year prior to Hurricane Wilma, which ripped through south Florida in October, 2005, 64 homes had new owners at the . A snapshot of the present may show the Housing Bubble has already popped. Read more ....

6/02/2006 05:29:00 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

You can do a lot to For example, curb appeal sells: do some landscaping. Plant some flowers. Remember that the front door greets buyers. Make sure it offers potential a bright, warm welcome.

6/22/2006 10:08:00 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

The real estate market really . Overpriced homes. Underpricing buyers. Especially tough to sell in a market more interested in hurricanes than square feet under air. But maybe this is the way. Enjoyed your site. Thanks.

6/23/2006 07:38:00 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

In the year prior to Hurricane Wilma, which ripped through south Florida in October, 2005, 64 homes had new owners at the . A snapshot of the present may show the Housing Bubble has already popped.

6/25/2006 07:56:00 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Hint #7 for . Safety First: Keep halls and stairways clear. Avoid cluttered appearances and possible injuries

6/25/2006 06:45:00 PM  
Anonymous today's interest rates said...

Hi Fellow! I was just searching blogs,and I found yours! I like it!
If you have a moment, please visit my today's interest rates site.
Good luck!!

6/26/2006 09:44:00 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Someone knows how to bring a lot of into your home, over a single weekend. Opportunity attracts them. Emotion captures them. Competition excites them. Their wallets open. Top dollar for your home pops out in an open bidding process that concludes on a single Sunday afternoon .

6/26/2006 11:39:00 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Blogged your blog and enjoyed the experience. Nice break from my own real estate work. Thanks. Visit my site if you have a chance.

7/02/2006 02:15:00 PM  
Blogger Debt Consolidation Refinance said...

Great Blog! I love to see informative sites and active discussion. I have bookmarked this site so I can check in from time to time. If you have a chance check out this site http:\\thehomemortgageguide.com which has alot of valuable info on Poor credit home loan Thanks again for the Blog

7/03/2006 07:46:00 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

The average home is currently on the for about 4 months before it goes to contract. Around 15% of initial real estate contracts never make it to a successful closing ... something goes wrong, and the frustrated seller puts the home back on the real estate market .

7/04/2006 09:07:00 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

. Silence Is Golden: Be courteous but don't force conversation with a potential buyer. He wants to inspect your house, not pay a social visit.
Go here for more ideas.

7/05/2006 11:20:00 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Hint #12 for . Harmonize The Elements: FM radio or stereo on softly, TV off. All lights on, day or night. Drapes open in the daytime, closed at night. If it's hot, cool it!

7/05/2006 10:57:00 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Hint #6 for . Clutter will clog a sale: Display the full value of your space by removing all unnecessary articles. Consider storing things you don't need all the time.

7/08/2006 06:08:00 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Blogging is not always a rewarding journey, but I ran across yours on this trip and it was a good break from my own real estate work. Thanks. Keep up the interesting work and visit my site if you have a chance.

7/08/2006 08:35:00 PM  

Post a Comment

<< Home